Compression for injury treatment and recovery

Compression of an area forces the veins to work harder to move the blood in the area. Although studies show no real benefit to compression during exercise, it has been shown to dramatically improve recovery post-exercise. Compression clothes are the most common and easiest way to create compression, Localized compression can be achieved with bandaging.

Graduated compression is necessary to ensure the blood in the veins is routed towards the heart for re-oxygenation. Graduated compression means taking off the compression every few hours. This means you can help flush out lactic acid and even prevent varicose veins, swelling, blood clots and more. Good compression clothes are contoured and have a specific fit pattern to ensure adequate compression in the right areas.

Compression can:

  • Reduce muscle vibration and micro trauma to muscle tissues
  • Hold any ligaments and joint in line for improved efficiency
  • Bring more oxygen and nutrients to any injured area
  • Flush out lactic acid and waste in the blood stream
  • Keep out swelling in any joint
  • Help increase joint stability
  • Reduce over-pronation when running
  • Dramatically reduce your risk of blood clots from traveling

Follow the manufacturer’s fitting guidelines when trying on compression clothes. They should be very tight and difficult to get on and off. However breathing and blood flow around the body should not be affected. If you feel faint then the clothes are too tight.

Compression is best used for about an hour to 3 hours long with a break of a few minutes then repeated if necessary. In the case of surgery of major injury compression can be applied for a solid period of up to 48 hours.

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